journal-prompts-postWe all know the extraordinary benefits of journaling (for both your mind and body):

  • It forges strong mental health (by enhancing your memory, elevating your mood, and battling depression) source
  • It combats stress and anxiety (by helping you prioritize, identify you anxiety’s patterns/triggers, and focus intensely on the positivessource
  • It can even boost your immune system (meaning fewer doctor’s visits, or even a lower chance of disease) source

But as you know, you can’t get those journaling benefits or reach your journaling goals if you don’t have good journal prompts… and as you journal, you’ll probably struggle to constantly create the best, powerful, useful, worthwhile prompts.

…But if that struggle sounds familiar, don’t feel defeated:

You only need a few powerful journal topics to inspire your writing.

…And I’ve found not just one, but 101 of those journal writing prompts… plus created a guide for how to choose your best prompt.

Out of all 101, I believe there’s a worthwhile prompt for every man’s journal… and that this detailed guide can deliver many inspiring prompts for yours.

How to Choose the Best Journal Prompts for You

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You could start with any prompt from this list (because they’re all good topics)… but I think you’d rather carefully choose one that will actually add meaning to your journal (and make the time you spend journaling worthwhile).

So, how do you carefully choose that worthwhile prompt?

Simple. Follow these simple three steps:

Step #1: Understand why you’re journaling… and what type of prompt will help you

Before you know if a prompt is right for you, you have to know what you’re using your journal for. In other words… how can you know a prompt is helpful, if you don’t know what, exactly, you want a journal to help with?

So ask yourself why you’re journaling:

  • Is it for therapy?
  • To track progress/behavior/goals?
  • To write pros/cons lists, or make decisions?
  • To remember your history?
  • To stretch your mind?
  • To practice writing skills?

The right prompt for you will help you meet that specific goal… so first identify it, and then find journal topics that will help you meet it.

Step #2: Know why you enjoy journaling

This step is simple:

Choose journaling topics that sound interesting/enjoyable.

Why is that so important?

Journaling should be a fun, helpful hobby, not a cause for stress. If you choose prompts that interest you (or will help you become a better man), you’ll enjoy journaling, and not feel pressured/stressed to write about boring, useless topics.

Step #3: Understand what makes good journal topics

I wanted to see what other people were recommending as “good journal prompts”, so I did a few Google searches. What I found was thousands of journaling ideas… most of which were useless.

And in thinking about why they were, I realized that for a prompt to be useful and worthwhile, it has to have a few fundamental characteristics:

  1. It has to help you reach one of the goals above. Any prompt you choose should help you meet your journaling goal. If it’s not helping you reach your goal, what’s the point in writing about it?
  2. It shouldn’t be too specific. The purpose of journaling is to explore your thoughts… and if a prompt is too specific, you can quickly run out of things to say on that exact topic. Prompts should be vague enough that you can have many thoughts on the subject.
  3. It should make you think deeply. Now, not all prompts are deep philosophical questions, but any good journal prompt should make you think (because the more you think, the more you can write about… plus, most guys would agree, thinking more makes you a vastly better man). 

Every one of the prompts below can meet these criteria: they’re intentionally vague, can be thought about deeply, and will help with at least one journaling goal.

The Best 101 Journal Prompts, Topics, and Ideas

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These 101 journal prompts are divided into 7 sections… and each section is designed to help you reach different journaling goals.

Now, remember:

These prompts are just ideas, or jumping-off points for writing. If one of these journal ideas inspires you with a different prompt idea, then write about that!

Here are the sections:

Prompts to Get You Started (21 Prompts)

These prompts have two purposes:

  1. To get you used to writing down your thoughts. These journal topics aren’t too serious/personal, so beginners won’t feel intimidated by them. You can use these non-invasive prompts to start working towards your journaling goals.
  2. To introduce you to ‘stream-of-consciousness’ writing… which is writing down all your thoughts as they come to you, without stopping/editing. This technique allows you to deeply explore your own thoughts (and gets you ready for the Prompts to Know Yourself Better below).

Now:

These topics aren’t only for beginners (experienced journalists can use them to combat writer’s block), but they’re perfect to help beginners get used to journaling.

1. What are some places you’ve enjoyed visiting

You can make this a detailed, organized list (to practice logical writing skills), or you can freely write about all your favorite places (to practice stream-of-consciousness writing).

Plus, this list is a great jumping-off point to write about places you want to visit.

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2. Describe your first girlfriend in detail

It’s a simple prompt… but it will make you practice writing and recalling memories in detail.

In fact, recalling in-depth details can actually help you improve your overall memory… so if you struggle with a poor/weak memory, use any recall prompt (about the events of your day, your first airplane flight, your first pet, etc.) to powerfully improve it.

3. What’s a manly hobby you want to pursue

This prompt has two potential benefits:

  1. You’ll get writing practice, about which hobby you want to pursue, why you want to pursue it, and what you’ll gain from it
  2. You’ll be inspired to actually pursue that manly hobby

Here’s our list of the best hobbies for men to try…  see what hobbies inspire you.

4. When did you last read a book, why did you read it, and what it was about

If you deeply think about this topic… not just the book’s name, but why you read it, what it was about, did you like it, did you learn from it, etc. you’re actually learning to explore and analyze your thoughts.

…And this skill, self-analyzation, is extremely beneficial in understanding why you do things (which can help you change your behaviors).

5. What’s a secret habit/thing you enjoy

Unless you plan on publishing every journal entry you write, feel free to use your journal to get secrets ‘off your chest’.

Writing freely like this can be highly therapeutic… it gives your brain some relief from hoarding secrets.

6. You’re going to/never going to move away because…

This is an easy, fun topic that gets you used to writing…

…without having to think too deeply (or about painful topics). Just write freely about where you live, and whether or not you want to stay (and why).

7. The things in your life that are most important to you, in order

Organizing this list in order of importance makes the prompt a little harder, and you may have to edit your work (which is great if you’re journaling to become a better writer (trust me, even good writers have to edit often)).

…And as an added bonus, it can help you realize how grateful you should be for the good things in your life.

8. Write down everything happening around you at this moment

This is the ideal stream-of consciousness prompt:

Write down everything you see, hear, smell, and feel.

Be as detailed as possible, and don’t stop writing for a second (don’t allow yourself to re-read and edit sentences as you write… let your thoughts flow freely).

9. What are your thoughts on a news story

There are so many news stories (bad and good, local and international) out there to write about.

You can journal about a story you have strong feelings about… or to challenge yourself a little more, write about the first story you read (it’s more challenging because you haven’t had time to gather your thoughts on it).

10. Write a food/movie review

This is a fun one… and it can help you become a better writer.

Be as critical as possible about the most recent movie you saw/meal you ate. Build a logical argument about why the movie/meal was good or bad (make your readers trust your argument), and use powerfully descriptive language (keep your readers interested).

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11. Plan out, in detail, how to build something

This prompt has two purposes:

  1. To get used to using your journal to plan
  2. To inspire you to actually build something

Many men use journaling to plan for success, and you can start that practice by planning out how to build a bookshelf, entertainment center, lounge chair, etc. (and if you actually build the item, it’s an added bonus).

12. Things you’d tell yourself as a teenager if you could go back in time

This prompt is valuable writing practice that get you used to thinking/reflecting deeply.

The older you get, the more wisdom you acquire… and if you remember, teenaged-you probably had little or no inner wisdom to live by.

Write him a letter about things to do, things to avoid, and the important things to look forward to.

13. What places would you plan a road trip to

Here’s yet another prompt with two purposes:

  1. Get used to using your journal to plan
  2. Get inspired to make a budget, plan a route, and go

14. What you love about your local area

This one will be easy for men who love where they are… and if that’s not you, try writing about your hometown, or favorite vacation spot (or anywhere you love to be).

Use this prompt to practice stream-of-consciousness writing: let your thoughts flow, and don’t stop writing on this topic until you have no more thoughts.

15. Your travel list

List every place you want to go in the world, and what you want to do there.

16. When have you been courageous

This prompt will get you used to narrating a past event… and give you a pretty nice ego boost.

Think of 3-5 times you’ve been courageous, and describe them in detail.

17. What things do you have to be grateful for

This exercise is good writing practice… but it also helps you use writing to feel positive.

List everything you can think of to be grateful for, and if you need help, check out our post on the topic.

After you’ve listed those things, write about why you’re so grateful to have each person/thing in your life.

18. What’s your favorite memory of your father/mother

Here’s a good way to express feelings without having to get too ‘mushy’:

If you have a good relationship with your father or mother (or other influential guardian) write about your best memory of that person.

19. What was the worst movie you ever saw

This is a fun way to practice writing, and learn to freely express thoughts on paper.

Write about a truly awful movie experience. What made it so bad?

20. From waking to sleeping, how would you spend your last day

What activities would you pack into your last day on Earth?

By writing about this, you can discover what’s important to you, and what things to pursue (if these activities are how you want to spend your last moments, shouldn’t you spend more time doing them now?)

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21. What do you hope happens with this journal

You don’t have to know the answer to this question when you start a journal, but writing about it can help you discover why you have the drive to write.

Prompts to Promote Deep Thought (10 Prompts)

These journal topics are some of my personal favorites, and they have a very simple purpose:

To get you thinking deeply.

Look:

When you try to simply meditate on difficult questions/topics (without writing down your thoughts), it’s incredibly easy to get distracted.

…But when you’re actually writing, you slow down and analyze each thought… and are more likely to reach conclusions without distractions.

Now:

I purposefully didn’t explain, thoroughly, my interpretation of these prompts… because you should write about what each one means to youMake sense?

22. How did the universe come into being

Where did we come from? And… why are we here?

23. Do humans decide to be good

Is goodness decided by the person being good… or is there a force that drives us toward/away from goodness?

24. If you could change one thing about life…

I’m not talking about your life… but life in general (physics, biology, history, etc.). What would you change?

25. Do you believe in ghosts

Why/why not? What happens when we die? Does everyone become a ghost?

26. How do you define art

Is all creation ‘art’? How specific/intentional does an artist have to be?

27. Are you a pacifist

Most men are against senseless killing, but what about war? Is it justified? To what extent?

28. Was math created or discovered

I’ve personally written about this one, and still can’t come up with an answer… but it’s fun to try! Did humans invent math as a way to understand the universe, or is math a universal language that we merely discovered?

29. Is morality relative

Basically, this is the age-old ‘where do good and evil come from?’ question. Since what’s good for one person might be evil for another… where does morality come from?

30. Is time-travel possible

Obviously, we haven’t done it… but can it ever happen in our universe? And what would happen if it did?

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31. Do you believe in soul mates

Some men believe in a predestined match, and some believe that couples can make a happy relationship with anyone, not only a soul mate. What do you think?

Prompts to Know Yourself Better (24 Prompts)

Journaling about yourself can help you identify the negative patterns in your thoughts, and make you feel hugely accomplished.

Here’s how:

When you write about yourself frequently, your writing will show patterns, or common thoughts that you have across many journal entries.

When you identify any negative patterns: like that you think you’re a failure, you blame others for every mistake you make, you’re staying with a girl/career that makes you unhappy, etc., you can resolve them.

And here’s the best part:

When you start to fix the problems your journal revealed, you’ll feel hugely accomplished.

Bonus: some of these journal ideas even help you see positive patterns in your life, instead of negative ones… and recognizing your positive traits can also make you feel hugely accomplished.

32. Are you an optimist or pessimist

Do a little research on optimism and pessimism, and determine what you think those words mean (there are different definitions out there, so define the terms for you before you proceed).

Then reflect, and write about which you think you are.

33. Take the Myers Briggs test, and write about your personality

The Myers-Briggs test classifies your personality based on 8 different personality ‘types’. Take an online version of the test, and read your results.

Now:

Do you agree with those results? And/or did you realize anything new about your personality?

34. You are an extrovert/introvert because…

This prompt has two meanings:

What do you do that makes you an extrovert/introvert? Basically, which one do you believe you are, and based on what evidence?

What made you into an extrovert/introvert? Are you extroverted/introverted because of a parent’s influence? Were you born this way? Did a past event make you change from extroversion to introversion or vice-versa?

35. Would you ever consider minimalism

Minimalism, like optimism, can have different meanings to different people.

Write how you define minimalism (here are our thoughts on the subject), and then write about whether or not you could adopt that lifestyle.

36. You would/wouldn’t like a woman to ask you out

You might have had this happen in the past, and you might not… but either way, you can have an opinion on it.

So ask yourself:

Would you like for women to ask you on dates? Or would you feel more comfortable asking? What exactly makes you feel that way?

37. If someone wrote a biography on you, what would the ‘blurb’ be

The ‘blurb’ of a biography is the short, 3-5 sentence summary of the person’s life. What do you really think an impartial writer would say in that short space? And do you like what he would say?

This one’s fun… but reflecting honestly on your life can be difficult. If you don’t like what the biographer would say about you, how can you change it?

38. What things make you angry the fastest

If you struggle with anger, this is a powerful self-help tool.

Know what makes you angry (by taking time to really think about the last few times you felt anger), and you know what to avoid/work on in the future.

39. You are good/bad at forgiveness

This is another difficult one, because you have to be honest with yourself (and you may not like realizing that you forgive too easily, or that you’re a bad forgiver). But here’s the thing:

Knowing how to improve the way you forgive can help make you a better (happier, more peaceful) man.

If you realize that you aren’t good at forgiving, see this prompt for your next journal entry.

40. If 10-year-old you saw yourself now, what would he think

What if you, as a 10-year old boy, met yourself now, and saw the man he’d become… what would he think?

Answer honestly. Would he be impressed? Proud? Bored? Disappointed?

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41. If you went into a bar and pretended to be someone else, you’d be…

This is another way of asking ‘what’s your alter ego?

If no one knew you, and you could pretend to be anyonewhat kind of man would you be? And why do you admire the traits of that man? Are they traits you could have for your real self?

42. What really inspires you to write, create, or succeed (what’s your muse)

This is a great question for men to ask themselves…

…because if you know what drives you to succeed, you know what to spend more time with to succeed even more (whether it’s a person, place, or activity). 

43. What’s the biggest problem you’re facing right now

This is a chance to vent about your problem, and/or search for a solution.

Sometimes writing down all your thoughts about a problem can force you to clearly see a solution you may have missed (when your thoughts about it were racing too fast).

44. If someone told you to mentally go to your ‘happy place’, where would you go

In your journal, describe your happiest place (in as much detail as possible).

This can be a highly therapeutic topic… you’ll feel relaxed as you describe your place, inspired to actually see that place, and reassured knowing you can reread about it when you feel stressed.

45. If money were no object, how would you spend your time

Here’s another way to feel relaxed and inspired:

If you were free to spend all your time doing whatever you wanted, what would it be?

Bonus: this prompt tells you what you need more of in your life (if you long for adventure, relaxation, relationships, etc.)

46. What was the best day of your life so far

Recall what the best day was, what made it so great, and why it mattered to you so much.

47. What political party do you consider yourself a part of

Look at the platforms of the major parties and see what you really agree with.

This prompt will help you get some writing practice, have a better view of our political system, and maybe even learn that you actually agree with the principles of a different party (or no party) than you thought.

48. What are your views on drugs and alcohol

Just like the above prompt, reaching deep into your thoughts might make you realize that you actually think something different than you imagined.

Plus, you’ll be better-prepared for debates with friends and/or political elections if you’ve prepared your thoughts (and you don’t have to stop at drugs/alcohol… try writing about any political topic).

49. Are you heavily influenced by music

Some men are, and some men aren’t… use your journal to decide if music has a strong effect on your mood and personality.

Now ask yourself:

Why does/doesn’t music have a strong effect on you, and what kind of music do you listen to?

50. When do you feel the most like ‘you’

This question is basically asking when are you the most comfortable? Is it when you’re hiking, sleeping, with another person, alone, or working?

Write about why you feel like the most you at those times, and what it says about you.

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51. Are you superstitious about anything

You may actually be a little superstitious and not know it… or you may think all superstitions are meaningless.

Either way, write about your opinion, and why you believe/don’t believe in superstitions.

52. Your personal motto

View our resource on choosing a personal motto, and write it down in your journal.

Explain why you chose that one, and what you want to accomplish with it. In the future, when you need to rely on your motto, you’ll have it written down to reference!

53. Your personal values

Discovering your personal values is actually an important step in determining a motto.

See our resource for help determining your values, and write down why your values matter to you.

54. The traits you have that make you a great man

This is a chance to freely brag on yourself (where no one will hear you), and give yourself a shameless ego boost.

What do you naturally have that makes you a great man: courage? Passion? Generosity?

55. Things you can do really, really well

Which of your learned skills set you apart from other men? Negotiating skills? Cooking? Physical fitness?

Use this space in your journal to discover rediscover why you worked hard on acquiring those skills.

(…And like I mentioned above, you can brag freely… no one will see.)

Prompts for Dealing with Other People (11 Prompts)

Some people journal to describe feelings that they can’t express to specific people.

…And it’s a powerful use for a journal: you can freely get your thoughts out, but you don’t have to deal with the anxiety/consequences of sharing them.

Now:

Sometimes this type of journaling feels good (in letting your true feelings out), and sometimes reflecting on emotions you find painful is… well, painful.

But either way, expressing your honest feelings is a form of therapy, and can help stop the feelings of regret/remorse/anger/debt to the people you’re writing about. source

56. What person has been the strongest influence on you

Who has done the most to make you the man you are? This person’s influence can be bad or good, but it’s undeniably powerful.

Now:

Are you grateful to this person, or angry? And are you glad this person entered your life?

57. How much do you know about your father/best friend/brother

Think about the man you’re closest to, and list what you know about his past and personality.

Do you wish you knew him better?

58. Things you can do better for your wife/things she can do better for you

This prompt can have at least one positive outcome: a stronger relationship for you and your partner.

Be honest about your shortcomings with your wife/girlfriend. Will you try harder to be a better boyfriend/husband? And will you tell her what she can do better?

59. Write a letter to someone you need to forgive

Look:

Whether or not you can actually tell this person your feelings, writing about them can help you work through your anger (freeing you, in a sense, from holding on to that anger).

Write the person you should forgive an honest letter. After you write it, document how you feel… do you feel better?

60. How do you see progress in your son/daughter

If you’re a dad, you know how important it is for your children to become good people.

So take a page or two and brag on your kids. How are they becoming good people? Do you have any part in that?

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61. Who are you proud of

The person you’re proudest of could be your kids, or your wife, or your best friend.

Why are you so proud of them? Would you ever tell them that you’re proud?

62. Who are you proud to have chosen you

This one’s a little confusing, so let me explain:

There might be a man or woman that has chosen to be close to you. And not just any man or woman…really great person, and a powerful influence. You’re proud of yourself that such a great person chose to be your friend.

Who are they? What makes them so great? Why did they choose to be close to you?

63. What raising technique do you disagree with your parents about

Whether or not you’re raising kids yourself, you can have strong opinions about your parents’ style of child-rearing.

Are you angry/proud of your parents for how they raised you? What would you do differently when raising your own children?

64. What person has been the strongest influence on your current position

Why are you where you are? Was it a decision influenced by someone else? A push you needed? Or was it you?

And are you grateful to this influential person, or angry with them about where you are in life?

65. Write a letter to your boss

You can thank your boss for pushing you and giving you the opportunities you have…

…or you can really let him have it. Either way, it’s therapeutic to get it out.

66. Write a letter to someone you want to forgive you

Write a deep apology to someone you want to forgive you (whether you send it or not).

Prompts to Prepare Yourself for the Future (21 Prompts)

A great use for a journal is to track goals, fears, and successes… basically, to use your journal to stay motivated, track your progress, understand why you have/haven’t succeeded… and form strong plans to succeed next time.

All these journal prompts help you reach those goals… by helping you use past events to plan for your future.

Pretty cool, right?

67. Things to do today, this week, this month

Here’s a great use for a journal: keep track of all your important tasks.

It can get you in the habit of writing things down and referencing your journal (a good habit, if you want to use your journal more)… plus, it helps you stay on top of your to-do list.

68. How are you a different man than you were 10 years ago

Really reflect for this one: how are you different (both in positive and negative ways)?

…And don’t just write about your income and location. Those things change for almost every man over 10 years. Examine your personality, values, skills, and lifestyle as well.

Once you’ve identified how you’ve changed, identify how you want to change in the next 10 years.

69. Your 5-year plan

Every man should have a vision for where he’ll be in 5 years… and it makes sense, right? If you don’t have a general goal for your life in the future, how do you know what to work on?

Think of your 5-year plan like a road map, leading you to that vision.

Keep the plan in your journal, where you can be inspired by it often.

70. What was the best part of this week

If you habitually write down the week’s best moment each Friday… when you reread it on Monday morning, you can put yourself in a positive mindset for the week.

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71. Your company would be so much better if…

Executives who don’t know the employees or customers often make most of the decisions… and the longer you work anywhere, the more you notice what could be done better.

So ask yourself:

What are some things you’d do differently/better if you were the CEO?

Planning a hypothetical like this can prepare you to make big decisions at work in the future… and can help you come up with creative solutions at work now.

72. What habits do you want to form, to make yourself a better man

There’re always things you can do to make yourself a better man, right?

Use your journal to write some of them down… and then document your success with them (this can help keep you accountable, and make you feel great when you finally form the good habit).

73. What was your biggest mistake this week

This is a powerful prompt that you should try to use every week.

Tracking your mistakes can help you identify patterns… and hopefully inspire you to correct your most common mistakes.

74. How to manage your finances this year

A written plan can help you stick to a goal source , and since financial goals are so important (yet so hard to stick to), write them down in your journal.

Write down your budget, how you’ll invest, and what you’ll save for this year, then stick to it.

75. What’s the biggest problem you have with women

‘Using your past to plan for the future’ doesn’t have to mean at work… because a large number of men want to be successful with women, too.

So identify your biggest problem with women, and why you have that problem. Once you identify the problem, you’re better prepared to overcome it.

76. How do you respond in crisis

Your crisis-response technique is the clearest after a crisis (when you can ask ‘how did I handle that?’), but it’s best to know before a crisis happens.

Take some time and really think about how you respond when there’s a crisis. Do you panic? Get angry? Shut down? Most importantly, how can you handle a crisis better next time?

77. How can you manage time better

Almost every man struggles with time management… when we have so much to do, it can be incredibly hard to prioritize (and prioritizing poorly can lead to important things not getting done).

Use your journal to plan how you’ll manage time better, and what things you should prioritize.

78. Your top 5 short-term goals

This is a very different prompt than Your 5-year Plan above. Instead of asking where you want to be in 5 years, you’re asking:

What 5 short-term goals now will help you get to the next step in your 5-year plan?

Basically, you’re planning for how to reach your 5-year goal. Cool, right?

79. The woman you want to marry is…

List the traits in a wife that are really important to you.

Now ask yourself:

If you’re single… are you looking the right places to meet this woman? If you’re dating someone… does the woman you’re with show these traits?

80. What single thing can you do tomorrow to say the day was a success

This simple task helps you prioritize. You probably have 100+ things to do this week, but if you focus on the most important one to do tomorrow, you won’t get as overwhelmed with less important tasks.

Make a habit of writing down the most important goal for the day, and completing it first.

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81. Things in the next year you’re looking forward to

This prompt is designed to make you feel positive about the coming year.

What are you looking forward to… meeting goals? Getting married? Starting a business? Taking a vacation? Whatever it is, use your journal to express your excitement, and consciously make plans during the year to get to that goal.

82. What are your awesome, inventive ideas

You know you have some ideas about how to make life better/easier.

Use your journal to write them down, plan them out, and maybe even find a way to make them happen.

83. If you could choose a mentor, it would be…

If you don’t have a mentor, I strongly suggest you find one (mentors are highly believed to help men reach goals source).

Write in your journal who you think would be a good mentor for you, and why you want to have that person coach you. Would you ever ask him to mentor you?

84. Your eulogy

Write a speech to be read at your funeral if your funeral was tomorrow.

This seems a little morbid, but it can help you realize the important things you’ve done in your lifeand realize what important things you still want to accomplish.

85. What circumstance has altered your path the most

Reflect on the one mishap/decision/circumstance has led you to where you are right now. Would you repeat it?

86. What are the pros/cons of marriage

What do you really think about the institution of marriage?

This is obviously an important prompt for a man considering marriage… but it’s also good for single men to know (because you shouldn’t date a girl with different marriage views, right?).

87. How many jobs have you held, and what you did you learn from each

No matter how crappy a job was, it wasn’t a waste of time if you learned something from it.

Take some time and write down everything you’ve learned from your jobs (even the crappy ones). Have your jobs taught you things that have made you a better man? Are you choosing jobs that aren’t teaching you enough?

Prompts to Deal with Past Events (9 Prompts)

I’ve mentioned that journaling has been successfully used in psychotherapy sourceand so I chose to include journal topics that help work through a difficult time/set of feelings (like you would in psychotherapy).

Now:

I do suggest that you speak to a therapist before you start journaling on these difficult topics, and use that person for support during this time.

88. What’s the most upsetting thing that’s ever happened to you

Remember why it upset you so much. Does it still upset you?

89. Who are the people you have in your life who support you

No matter what you’ve been through, there are probably people in your life who want to help you through anything. Use this journal space to remind yourself who you have to lean on.

90. What’s the most afraid you’ve ever been

Recall the worst experience you’ve had with fear. Are you still afraid?

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91. What things does fear hold you back from doing

What are you not accomplishing, because you’re afraid? Ask yourself… how you can work past fear to accomplish those things?

92. Write a letter to someone you love, but can’t express

For whatever reason, you may be unable to tell someone you love them. Tell them in your journal, and let those thoughts out.

93. Write a letter to someone you hate, but can’t express

This is the reverse of the above prompt: let your thoughts out in your journal.

94. What keeps you up at night worrying

Make a list of worries, and ask yourself: are these good reasons to worry?

95. What are the flaws and strengths of your physical appearance

Make two equal lists of the good and bad things about you. What can you change?

96. What’s the biggest guilt you have

All men experience guilt. Write freely about your guilt in your journal, where you can be honest because no one else will read it.

Out-of-the-Box Prompts (5 prompts)

There’s one important thing to remember:

This journal is yours, and you can use it however you want. If you just don’t feel like writing on a prompt, that’s ok. Try one of these 5 alternate uses for your journal.

You’ll still be creating content, and you can still use your journal to think deeply, or reach a goal.

97. People watch, and make up a story for people you see

Go to any public place and quietly observe people around you (a public park works great, since most people you see will stay for a while… giving you more time to observe).

While observing them, write a fake character sketch for the person’s identity, history, personality, quest, downfalls, etc.

This is insanely fun, and doing it can help you create good character sketches/story ideas.

98. Document an ‘experiment’ (cold shower, paleo diet, new workout)

If you’re thinking of trying something new: a new diet, a new workout, a social experiment, or a personal challenge (like cold showering), you should absolutely use your journal to document it.

Why is that?

You’ll remember every detail of your experiment (and be able to turn your notes into a book/article if you want), and you’ll be able to see what mistakes you made (and/or where your willpower was weak).

99. Keep a food journal

If you want to eat healthier, try to keep a journal of what you eat.

Knowing that you’ll write down everything you eat keeps you more accountable… and can help you stick to your healthy eating plan. source

100. Draw!

Who says journaling has to be in words?

If you express thoughts well through pictures, use your journal as a sketchbook. You can even combine words with sketches.

101. Re-write an old journal entry now

Find an older prompt (from a year or more ago), where you express thoughts about yourself. Read what you wrote, then completely re-write it. How have your thoughts changed?

Try doing this several times over the course of journaling. Looking back, and reflecting on your old self, can help you see how you’ve become a powerfully better man as the years pass.

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In Conclusion

Journaling is a hugely powerful tool.

Use these 101 hand-picked journal prompts, topics and ideas to help express your thoughts, reach your goals, and even work through your life’s problems.